Monthly Archives: November 2016

Hodgson Comic!


Blog reader Tim Tylor sent in a link to a blog that reproduces a 10 page adaptation of Hodgson’s “The Derelict”! I’ve often been mystified that WHH has not been adapted more in comics and other media so am very happy to see this. Unfortunately, near as I can tell, the blog does not credit where this was printed or who did the writing/artwork! I am further hampered at my inability to read Spanish so can anyone provide any more information about this excellent adaptation?

Because I do not own these images, I am reproducing only two select pages from this tale. You can see the story in full by clicking over to the blog link later in this post.

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I really love the artwork here and feel it captures the mood and horror of Hodgson’s story perfectly. Anyone know who the artist might be?

To read the rest of this great story, go to Jose Aviles’ blog at:

http://joseavilesblog.blogspot.com/2009/06/derelict-de-w-h-hodgson.html

His entry is dated 2009 so clearly the adaptation precedes it. I’m very curious to learn more about this and wonder if there might be more Hodgson comic stories out there waiting to be found?

 

 

 

 

 

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SARGASSO #3 Now Available


12017605_943499519020913_3188306750000256399_oThe third, and final, issue of SARGASSO is now available to order through Amazon!

At 150 pages, this may be the best issue yet!  The contents include:

 

Essays

 

“A Particular Phase of Constructive Thought: Hodgson’s Trilogy of Novels”

by Joseph Hinton

 

“Utter Quiet in All the Land: A Recurring Motif”

by Ryan Jefferson

 

The House on the Borderland: The Ultimate Horror Novel”

by Liam Garriock

 

“Ye Hogge”: Liminality and the Motif of the Monstrous Pig in Hodgson’s “The Hog” and The House on the Borderland”

By Leigh Blackmore

 

“The House on the Burren: The Physical and Psychological Foundations of The House on the Borderland

by Joseph Hinton

 

“Terminal Eden: The Last Redoubt and the Closure of History”

by Brett Davidson

 

Poetry

 

“The Beautiful Mirdath”

By Charles Danny Lovecraft

 

 

“From a Mariner on the Glen Carrig”

By Charles Danny Lovecraft

 

 

“Night Land—And What I Saw”

by Charles Danny Lovecraft

 

 

Fiction

 

“Corpse-Light”

by Josh Reynolds

 

“A Hideous Communion”

by James Gracey

 

Front and back cover art are once again by the incomparable Robert Knox!

Copies can be ordered via this link or, if you are outside the US, try your international Amazon website.

And, of course, the first two issues of SARGASSO are also still available on Amazon.

Putting together these three issues was a great deal of work and frustration. I hope that, in its small way, they have helped increase interest about Hodgson and his work.

Thanks for all your support!

 

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY, WHH!


 

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William Hope Hodgson portrait by Dave Felton

Today, November 15th, is Hodgson’s 139th birthday!

It was on this day in 1877 that William Hope Hodgson was born to Samuel , an Anglican priest, and Lizzie Sarah Hodgson. The second of twelve children, three of whom would die in infancy, Hope and his family had a hard life. They were often poor and reliant upon the charity of Samuel’s parishioners. A controversial figure, Samuel was moved about frequently by the church, serving 11 parishes in 21 years before his death in 1892.

In 1890, Hope was apprenticed into the Merchant Marine and he would spend the next 10 years at sea sailing around the world several times and receiving the Royal Humane Society medal for heroism after saving a shipmate who had fallen into shark infested waters. During his time at sea, Hope would also develop his life-long interests in physical culture and photography.

whh fam

Returning home, Hope started a ‘School for Physical Culture’ which, unfortunately, closed after only a few years. It is at this point that he turned to writing.

It is often a mystery how a man whom, we assume, had no literary intentions could become such a powerful and influential writer. Whatever the reason, Hodgson left us four unique novels as well as a significant amount of short stories that still manage to entertain and enthrall us today.

After his unfortunate death at Ypres during World War I in 1918, Hodgson’s work continued to find new readers and devotees. At risk of being forgotten, Hope’s writings were kept alive by August Derleth at ARKHAM HOUSE and H. C. Koenig.

Today, Hodgson is cited as an influence by many writers and his work is better known now than it ever was during his lifetime. We look forward to this continuing to grow as more and more people discover Hodgson and his unique visions.
So, wherever you are today, raise a glass of whatever you’re drinking in salute to the old man and give a hearty “hail and well-met” across time and space to the dweller in the House on the Borderland!

 

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