Category Archives: Carnacki

CARNACKI Play Update!


We’ll be returning to more of our reprint of R. Alain Everts’ biographical article on WHH but we received word about the stage play based on Carnacki that recently premiered in London.

SONY DSCThis is from an email from creator M. J. Starling:

Thanks again for posting about Audience with the Ghost Finder. I thought you might be interested to know how the premiere went.
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The premiere took place on 8 May. After three performances, tickets were selling so well that the producers, Blackshaw Theatre (www.blackshawonline.com) decided to add an extra performance to the original run of five. The sixth and final night, on 17 May, was completely sold out – standing room only.
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Considering this was my first play, the reviews have been better than I could have hoped:
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Lauren Mooney, A Younger Theatre: “having been raised on a diet of  ’70s sci-fi and TV repeats of The Devil Rides Out, I had a whale of a time” http://www.ayoungertheatre.com/review-london-pride-and-audience-with-the-ghost-finder/
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Deborah Klayman, The Public Reviews: ★★★★ “brilliantly written … Alexander Pankhurst’s Carnacki is intriguing and terribly funny all at once” http://www.thepublicreviews.com/london-pride-audience-with-the-ghost-finder-the-selkirk-upstairs-london/
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Helen Gush, stage2page: “Double Thumbs Up … the audience are an integral part of the superstitious geometric symmetry, forming a protective circle around the two actors … Alexander Pankhurst is an excellent fit for Carnacki – very British, clipped, poised but with an edge of eccentricity … fun mystery” http://stage2page.wordpress.com/2013/05/10/double-thumbs-up-for-blackshaws-double-bill/
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Christianna Mason, What’s Peen Seen?: 4/5 “a great new play … highly recommended” http://whatspeenseen.co.uk/reviews/a-theatrical-double-bill-london-pride-audience-with-the-ghost-finder-review/
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Not bad for Carnacki’s first time treading the boards! And nothing’s confirmed, so I can’t do much more than hint, but the show was well enough received that I’m now looking at ways to bring it to a wider audience.
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There are loads of backstage and production photos on Blackshaw’s blog: www.blackshawonline.com/blog
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Congratulations to everyone involved in the play.  Let’s hope that it becomes so successful that it eventually jumps the pond over here so that we Hodgson-deprived Americans can see it!

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SARGASSO #1


I am pleased to announce the contents of the forthcoming SARGASSO: The Journal of William Hope Hodgson Studies Issue #1!  I think we have an outstanding selection of essays, fiction, poetry and art all devoted to WHH.  I’m sure you will agree.

1 sargasso

SARGASSO #1

Essays

“Shadow Out of Hodgson” by John D. Haefele

“A Reassessment of William Hope Hodgson’s Poetry” by Phillip A. Ellis

“William Hope Hodgson’s Sales Log: The Pleasure and Consequences of Collecting” by Jane Frank

“The ‘Wonder Unlimited’–The Tales of Captain Gault” by Mark Valentine

“Always Sea and Sea: The Night Land as Sea-Scape” by Emily Alder

“The Long Apocalypse: The Experimental Eschatologies of H. G. Wells and William Hope Hodgson” by Brett Davidson

“Ab-Reality: The Metaphysical Vision of William Hope Hodgson” by Neal Alan Spurlock

“Things Invisible: Human and Ab-Human in Two of Hodgson’s Carnacki Stories” by Leigh Blackmore

Poetry

“In Memory of Hope” by Phillip A. Ellis

“Beyond the Deaths of Worlds” by Phillip A. Ellis

Fiction

“A Question of Meaning” by Pierre V. Comtois

“The Blue Egg” by William Meikle

Artwork from

Andrea Bonazzi

Steve Lines

Pete Von Sholly

Nick Gucker

Allen Koszowki

Not bad for a first issue, eh?

The only problem is how to top this?  I should probably start working on that now!

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ATTENTION ALL SCHOLARS!!!!


scholarFor some time now, I’ve wondered if there might be little caches of Hodgson letters squirreled about in various libraries and universities and the like.  So, I am issuing the call to all those readers of this blog to help me find them!

Seriously, the cause of Hodgson research and criticism has long suffered from a lack of primary sources such as letters and the such.  We need to find out if there are any out there which are available for scholars and historians to use.  This is a project that will benefit everyone looking to do research on/about Hodgson and those who want to read it!  And we’re not just looking for letters that Hodgson may have written but those by his family, friends, etc.

Please use all your resources.  Check everywhere you can!  Post your findings here in the comments section.  I will take all of them (hopefully, there will be some) and create a new page here on the blog listing these resources and those scholars who brought it to my attention.

The only collection I am aware of is the letters that form part of a collection at the Harry Ransom center at the University of Texas at Austin.  Anything else is fair game.

So, as Carnacki would say at the end of a story, “out you go!”

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CARNACKI Submissions Deadline EXTENDED!


CARNACKI copy

I’m hearing from a number of writers and its been going something like this: “Just found out about your new anthology of Carnacki stories but I’ve missed the deadline!”  Well, luckily, I’m still in the process of reading stories and would like to add a few more so I’m extending the deadline until May 20, 2013. 

Which means that if you’ve got a Carnacki story in you, there’s still time to send it in!  The guidelines are pretty simple:

  • Stories no longer than 5,000 words
  • Electronically submitted in a Microsoft Word or RTF format
  • Double-spaced
  • Times New Roman font no large than 12pt
  • No gore or excessive violence
  • Payment in two (2) contributors copies of final book
  • Book will be available in print and electronic formats

I’ve got a line up of some really excellent stories here but I’m always on the hunt for more so send them to me at my email: lordshazam@yahoo.com with “CARNACKI SUBMISSION” in the subject line. 

Please feel free to share this post everywhere you can and remember to use the forgotten line from the SaaaMaaa Ritual when the outside forces attack!

 

 

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CARNACKI ON THE STAGE!


Yes!  Carnacki is heading for the stage!

carnacki play1

In an original story by playwright M. J. Starling, Carnacki takes to the stage for an all-new case of ghost-finding in LONDON!  Here’s what Starling has to say about the project:

“The play is an original story devised by me, but features, Carnacki, Dodgson, the Water Circle, the Electric Pentacle, and lashings of abnatural theory and lore from both Hodgson and HP Lovecraft’s ‘Dreams in the Witch-House’. It’ll be staged in-the-round, and all the action takes place within a Water Circle (later with the Electric Pentacle overlaid).
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“Alexander Pankhurst is playing Carnacki; Ceridwen Smith is playing Dodgson and two original characters, Mrs Judith Allenby and her cursed daughter Florence. It’s being produced by Blackshaw Theatre Company. Alex and Ceridwen have performed together in a Blackshaw production before: they were in the company’s adaptation of Mervyn Peake’s ‘Titus Groan’, he as Dr Alfred Prunesquallor, she as Lady Fuchsia Groan.
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“Here’s the official plot summary/blurb we’ve been using in programmes and event listings:
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“‘1912.  To lift a cruel curse, ab-natural investigator Carnacki must tread the border between enlightenment and madness.  Sherlock Holmes meets Ghostbusters in this original tale of William Hope Hodgson’s classic character, Carnacki the ghost finder.'”
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“Some useful facts and figures for anyone UK-based who wants to come see it:
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“Venue: The Selkirk Upstairs, 60 Selkirk Road, Tooting Broadway, London, SW17 0ES
“Date: May 8th, 9th, 10th, 15th and 17th
“Time: 7.00pm (doors), 7.30pm (start).
“Ticket Price: £10
“Ticket Bookings: www.ticketweb.co.uk
“Press Bookings: bookings@blackshawonline.com
Alex Pankhurst (Carnacki) being fitted for his costume. The other two in the photo are, on the left, Zara Mansouri, costume designer, and Michelle Bristow, costume assistant on the right.

Alex Pankhurst (Carnacki) being fitted for his costume. The other two in the photo are, on the left, Zara Mansouri, costume designer, and Michelle Bristow, costume assistant on the right.

I highly encourage everyone to check out this trailblazing production.  If I were in England, I’d be there every night!  Should any of the readers of this blog attend the performance, please add your comments and reviews.

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UPDATE: Carnacki, The New Adventures!


CARNACKI copy

 

We’re quickly reaching the deadline for submissions for our new anthology, CARNACKI: THE NEW ADVENTURES!  The deadline is May 1, 2013 and we’ve gotten some great submissions already but we’re looking for more!  So I’m reprinting the info from the original post and asking everyone to spread the word far and wide!

At last it can be told!

An anthology of all-new stories about Carnacki, the Ghost-Finder is NOW OPEN FOR SUBMISSIONS!

Later this year, to coincide with the first issue of SARGASSO (The Journal of Hodgson Studies), I will be publishing an all new collection of Carnacki stories and I am currently looking for submissions!

Carnacki remains one of Hodgson’s most popular creations with not only new stories about the character appearing but he has been included in comic books as well as novels from other writers.  I’m looking for a fresh crop of writers to tackle the stories of this intrepid Ghost-Hunter!

So here’s the details: stories should be between 3,000-6,000 words (anything longer, please query first); stories should feature Carnacki in some aspect; no explicit gore, violence or sex, please; payment will be in 2 contributors copies; DEADLINE for submissions is May 1, 2013 so, yes, this will be closing quickly.

CARNACKI: THE NEW ADVENTURES is planned for an August, 2013, release at the Necronomicon convention in Providence, RI.

Send your submissions (or questions) to me at: lordshazam@yahoo.com with the tag CARNACKI SUBMISSION in the subject line.

I look forward to reading all of these great new Carnacki stories and presenting to everyone an exciting new collection of tales about this timeless character.  Get your submissions in early!  William Meikle already did!

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A new vision of Carnacki!


logo_web1

It’s funny how some things just happen.

Recently, a new reader (Orrin Grey) recommended this blog to a friend of theirs who emailed me about a Carnacki project of his own.  Besides making a new friend, I discovered a great artist with a deep love of Carnacki and all things Hodgson!

M.S. Corley is a graphic artist who has done several comic projects in the past.  (Check out his work on THE STRANGE CASE OF MR. HYDE, published by Dark Horse Comics.)  Lately, he has been working on a more personal project; bringing Carnacki to comics!

Here’s what Corley says about his project:

“The idea of the comic is telling stories about Carnacki investigating strange things, like his actual WHH stories but I plan on loosely adapting old pulp stories and folktales with him in it. For instance in one of the first two issues is a retelling of W.W.Jacobs ‘The Monkeys Paw’. So its less about ghost and more just about anything weird and supernatural, hence why I’m calling my comic Carnacki: Recorder of Things Strange instead of Ghost-Finder.”

Corley is currently working on the first story, “The Terror of London”, which he hopes to have finished soon.

In preparation for the story, Corley has done a series of pin-ups featuring Carnacki in various, dangerous situations.  You can see them on his blog here.

Corley’s artwork is similar to that of Mike Mignola (creator of HELLBOY) but still has it’s own style and technique.  Both are perfectly suited for Carnacki and I look forward to seeing what dangers he inflicts on our favorite ‘ghost-finder’.

Happily, Corley will be submitting a new Carnacki pin-up for the first issue of SARGASSO and will definitely be included in the upcoming CARNACKI: THE NEW ADVENTURES.

Thanks to M.S. Corley for allowing me to reprint his logo and one of the pin-ups from his page.  I am sure that everyone will find this as thrilling and exciting as I do!

pinup2

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ANNOUNCING: Carnacki, The New Adventures!


CARNACKI copyAt last it can be told!

An anthology of all-new stories about Carnacki, the Ghost-Finder is NOW OPEN FOR SUBMISSIONS!

Later this year, to coincide with the first issue of SARGASSO (The Journal of Hodgson Studies), I will be publishing an all new collection of Carnacki stories and I am currently looking for submissions!

Carnacki remains one of Hodgson’s most popular creations with not only new stories about the character appearing but he has been included in comic books as well as novels from other writers.  I’m looking for a fresh crop of writers to tackle the stories of this intrepid Ghost-Hunter!

So here’s the details: stories should be between 3,000-6,000 words (anything longer, please query first); stories should feature Carnacki in some aspect; no explicit gore, violence or sex, please; payment will be in 2 contributors copies; DEADLINE for submissions is May 1, 2013 so, yes, this will be closing quickly.

CARNACKI: THE NEW ADVENTURES is planned for an August, 2013, release at the Necronomicon convention in Providence, RI.

Send your submissions (or questions) to me at: lordshazam@yahoo.com with the tag CARNACKI SUBMISSION in the subject line.

I look forward to reading all of these great new Carnacki stories and presenting to everyone an exciting new collection of tales about this timeless character.  Get your submissions in early!  William Meikle already did!

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Why Hodgson?


(Today’s guest post comes from Dennis Price.   Dennis runs a really excellent site, http://www.eternalidol.com/, which is primarily about Stonehenge but he talks about a lot of other things too including classic horror.  In this essay, Dennis talks about how he discovered Carnacki and the impact it made on his life.)
13557_241026369224_2025534_nI first read Carnacki the Ghost Finder in the summer of 1980, shortly after I’d moved from my native Wales to north London. I can vividly remember reading it on a sunny Saturday afternoon while my flatmate Richard was watching a football game on television, but despite the less than atmospheric surroundings, I was absolutely enthralled by what I found on the pages before me.
 

At the time, I was around 20 years old and I’d already read a great many ghost stories and books on hauntings. I had happily devoured fictional tales, such as those written by M.R. James, while I’d also bought just about any books on real-life or historical hauntings that I could find. Over 30 years later, I find myself sat in my study surrounded by non-fiction books on just about everything from Alchemy to Zombies, alongside the works of Dennis Wheatley, Poe, Lovecraft, Machen and others, but I had never read anything quite like Carnacki the Ghost Finder and the memory of my first time very much lives with me to this day.

 

I suppose it was the perfect book at the perfect time for me. I’d studied Latin, Greek and Ancient History at school, so I’d been introduced to some fascinating material concerning the Underworld and the monsters that inhabited these shady realms. My schooling in the classics had imbued me with some discipline, while I’d earlier read a book entitled Gods, Graves and Scholars that contained the fantastic accounts of Champollion’s ingenious decipherment of the Egyptian hieroglyphs and Schliemann’s equally ingenious discovery of the fabled city of Troy. I was aware of Sherlock Holmes and I’d seen the Hammer version of the Hound of the Baskervilles, which is of course a brilliant investigation into an apparently lethal haunting, but Carnacki’s meticulous investigations were the first of their kind that I can remember reading.

 

On top of all that, I’d developed an interest in real-life, inimical hauntings, because by this time, I’d learned about the deadly phantoms in the Tower of London and in Berkeley Square. I then came to discover others, such as the haunting of a road in Devon that resulted in human fatalities a century or so ago and in recent years, I’ve learned of many more, but back in 1980, I was still coming to terms with the disturbing notion that supernatural entities could inflict physical harm. At the time, I was living in East Finchley, which is just a mile or so up the road from Highgate Cemetery, a place that was reputed to be the lair of a vampire, or so I was convincingly assured back in those pre-internet days.

So, while I was aware that Carnacki was a work of fiction, I wondered more and more about where William Hope Hodgson drew his inspiration from as far as the lethal hauntings he described were concerned. My curiosity led me to discover the remarkable manifestations produced by the medium Franek Kluski, as well as many other tantalising accounts of supernatural entities in the séance room, ruined castles and prehistoric monuments. Carnacki had enabled me to tap into a cornucopia of nightmare worlds, both in fiction and in historical accounts, something that continues to give me enormous pleasure.

 

In brief, I loved absolutely everything about the book and the compelling stories they contained. I even liked Carnacki’s habit of entertaining guests for the purpose of telling them about his exploits, because at around this time, I had joined the Dracula Society and I’d been warmly welcomed into its ranks. I attended a few dinners and I met some very pleasant and engaging people, and while I had greatly enjoyed chewing the fat with them, I soon decided that I was less interested in Gothic literature than in investigating some of “Hell’s mysteries”, as the great man described these matters in The Whistling Room. However, my application to join A Leading Paranormal Investigation Club of the time was tersely refused by the club’s president, so I decided “if you can’t join ‘em, beat ‘em”.

 

I don’t live my life by literary proxy, but like everyone else, I’m subject to outside influences to a greater or lesser degree and there’s no question that Carnacki’s investigations captured my imagination. I was particularly impressed by his attention to detail and his open mind, while I also liked his admissions that he could be mistaken and sometimes fooled. Of all the aspects of Thomas Carnacki’s character, I suppose I was most drawn to his ready confessions to feeling terror and loneliness when he was engaged in his nocturnal investigations.

 

Perhaps I’d have looked into them all anyway without ever having read the book in question, but Carnacki always came to mind whenever I had the opportunity to visit allegedly haunted locations in Britain and abroad, something I’ve been doing for decades. The most famous such places I’ve been to in direct connection with hauntings are Edgehill, Littlecote House, Borley, Clapham Woods and Silbury Hill, all of which were exhilarating, baffling and sometimes terrifying. The most satisfying investigation that I’ve ever undertaken was that of an apparently haunted church in southern Greece, on account of the feelings of sheer dread, puzzlement and disbelief I experienced when I was trying to fathom the true nature of the manifestations that were causing so much alarm to so many people, but I was also very gratified by the relief and sense of general well-being that followed when I was finally able to point out the agency behind the fearsome “Voice in the Night”.

 

What else? As this site’s devoted to an appreciation of William Hope Hodgson and his works, I’ll just mention that I wrote some adaptations of the Carnacki stories for a production company some years ago, but the less said about that unfortunate episode, the better. Very briefly, the people with whom I was dealing wanted a ‘love interest’ for Thomas Carnacki, along with other refinements to Hodgson’s writing that they felt would attract a large audience, whereas I felt the stories were just about perfect as they were.

It wasn’t until I looked through this site that I realised that Donald Pleasance had played Thomas Carnacki. I was lucky enough to meet this man a little while before his death in 1995 and I was in awe of him anyway on account of what I knew of his career, although if I’d known at the time that he’d once portrayed Carnacki, I would certainly have asked him about it at some length. Sadly, it was not to be.

I could continue like this for a long while, but perhaps it’s time to call a halt. I’ll conclude by saying that if Carnacki the Ghost Finder had been the only book that William Hope Hodgson had ever written, then it would have had pride of place in my book collection as a unique and engrossing literary marvel. However, we all know of Hodgson’s other works, so I’m looking forward to downing tools and indulging myself by reading every last thing on Sam’s site, while it’s obviously a place I’ll return to, because I know of few other more engrossing subjects than Carnacki the Ghost Finder and the brave, visionary and exceptional man who wrote it.

Dennis Price

Author, The Missing Years of Jesus

http://www.deadofnightproductions.com/

http://www.eternalidol.com/

(Many thanks to Dennis for sharing his thoughts with us.  I enjoy hearing how people discover Hodgson or what his writings mean to you so if you have a story to share, please contact me at: lordshazam@yahoo.com with the words “Guest Post” in the subject line.–Sam Gafford)

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100!!!!!!


100posts11This marks the 100th posting on the William Hope Hodgson Blog!

Back when I started this blog, several people questioned if there would be enough material to keep it going.  It wasn’t an entirely unjustified question.  After all, Hodgson doesn’t have as much devoted to him as, say, Lovecraft does.  But I felt that, whatever material I did have was important enough to present.

WHHHodgson is kind of the underdog in weird literature.  Doesn’t get a lot of press.  Guillermo del Toro isn’t lining up to direct a move based on THE NIGHT LAND.  There isn’t a convention devoted to Hodgson taking place in Blackburn.  There aren’t even any comic books doing “Hodgsonian” tales.

When I was a small press publisher back in the 1990s, I had a table at a local convention/show where I was selling my Hodgson reprints as well as a couple of Machen books and others.  The convention’s GOH was Neil Gaiman who was kind enough to stop by the table and talk a bit.  We chatted about Machen for a few minutes and gave him complimentary copies of my Machen books but, when I tried to interest him in the Hodgson, he wasn’t biting.  He just wasn’t all that keen on WHH…even when I was trying to give him FREE copies.  I’ve gotten that reaction a lot.

I guess that kind of stuck with me over the years as an example of Hodgson being the “Rodney Dangerfield” of weird fiction.  “He don’t get no respect!”

Through the years, that has always been one of the driving forces behind my efforts.  I want Hodgson to get more respect both from the readers and the literary circles.  WHH will never reach the stature of a Poe or Lovecraft (nor would even I say he deserves to be elevated so far) but there is much in WHH to enjoy and study.

This staged photo of WHH at a ship's wheel was used in his lectures about life at sea.

This staged photo of WHH at a ship’s wheel was used in his lectures about life at sea.

That was one of the reasons why I started this blog because there was no place on the internet to get a lot of this information.  You might get a bit here and there but it wasn’t centralized.  I wanted there to be a place where everyone could come to get old and new material and find out what’s going on in the world of Hodgson.

I hope that I have succeeded in that endeavor.

As we enter 2013, there are already new things in store for Hodgson and his fans.  Some new books are scheduled to come out and WHH is finally getting some of that critical attention that has been denied him for so long.

Hopefully, this year will see the publication of a new collection of Hodgson criticism and studies edited by Massimo Berruti and published by Hippocampus Press called VOICES FROM THE BORDERLAND.  It is an anthology of some old pieces and a lot of new ones as well.  I am happy to say that I will be represented in this volume by several articles and am honored to be included.

One of the most important items in VOICES FROM THE BORDERLAND will hopefully be the long-awaited Hodgson Bibliography which S. T. Joshi, Mike Ashley and I have been working on for well over 10 years now.  It is already over 100 pages long and covers international appearances as well as English.  It has been an invaluable resource in my own work and I look forward to sharing it with others.

A early photo of WHH.  I am not sure of the year but probably roughly around 1903 or so.

A early photo of WHH. I am not sure of the year but probably roughly around 1903 or so.

Already this year we have seen a new paperback of Hodgson stories from Night Shade Books called THE GHOST PIRATES AND OTHERS edited by Jeremy Lassen.  This has marked the first appearance by WHH in an inexpensive, mass produced paperback in several years.  Hodgson also was mentioned in S.T. Joshi’s two volume history of weird literature; UNUTTERABLE HORROR.

Later this year, Centipede Press will be releasing a collection of Hodgson stories compiled by S. T. Joshi.  I do not know the full contents of this book yet but I do know that it will contain the text of the original edition of THE HOUSE ON THE BORDERLAND.  Unfortunately, given the tendency of Centipede Press to produce expensive items, I fear it will not be cheap but I am sure that it will be a very attractively pro1 sargassoduced book.

In addition, 2013 will see the first issue of SARGASSO: The Journal of William Hope Hodgson Studies.  This will be a yearly publication highlighting new articles about Hodgson as well as Hodgson inspired art and stories.  I’ve already gotten a number of submissions and am expecting new articles by some of the biggest names in Hodgson criticism.

carnackiAnother project which I’m putting together is a special, 100th anniversary edition of CARNACKI.  This will be a deluxe edition, reprinting the original texts along with annotations.  With luck, I hope to have it available by November.  Going along with that, I would like to announce a collection of all-new Carnacki tales!  I’m opening this up to submissions today, with this post, in the hopes that everyone will spread the word!  I am looking for new tales of Carnacki in the Hodgson tradition so I encourage all of our writers out there to submit a story.  Details are still being negotiated so keep watching the blog for more announcements.

Already I am looking forward to the future.  Within the last 20 years, Hodgson has made great strides in critical and reader popularity.  Virtually all of his major fiction is now available either through e-books, print-on-demand or free online sites.  The next steps are to increase availability of his poetry and non-fiction so that, for new readers, everything is available.  This is a major difference from just a few years ago when it was difficult to easily find even Hodgson’s novels.  Today, we can state that Hodgson is better known and read than ever before.

William Hope Hodgson (1877-1918)

William Hope Hodgson (1877-1918)

And there is still so much more to learn!  Genealogy research has barely been touched and there is a great need for more study about Hodgson’s own life, opinions and beliefs.  Plus Hodgson has suffered from one major disadvantage: there has yet to be a full, book-length critical study of his works.  I hope to change this in the future.

It’s been a great 100 posts and I hope everyone will still around for the next 100!!

(I’d like to thank everyone who has helped with this blog over the last 100 posts.  I could not have done it without your overwhelming support and I humbly thank you all.  Whether you have contributed materials, shared knowledge, spread the word or just read the blog regularly, you are why I keep going and posting week after week.  I may be the person behind the blog but it is really for all of you.)

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